Wireless Production Intercom System



Wireless production intercom systems have a wide variety of business uses. Let's start by defining what a production intercom is. Users wear a headset that can either cover both ears or just a single ear. These headsets all communicate with each other. That communication can occur over wires, or in this case, over the airwaves. In most cases there may be some sort of central hub that all communication goes through. Production intercoms are used for lots of applications including: audio/visual productions like live theater, sports games, churches, TV studios, or recording studios.

But you don't need a production to find a use for these systems. You could use them for training students to snow ski, horse ride, hang glide or any other activity that requires two-way communication without shouting. Business communication uses include construction, restaurants, tree care, and crane operators among lots of others.

These systems are either full-duplex, or half-duplex (sometimes called simplex). Full-duplex is like a telephone conversation. Both sides can speak at the same time without having to press a button to talk. Half-duplex requires a button press and only one user can speak at a time. In live theater and many other applications where hands need to be kept free for working, constant full duplex communication is needed.

The benefits of a wireless system or a wired production intercom are obvious. With wired systems there is usually a beltpack that is worn on your belt and a cable is attached between it and the central hub. So if you need to move around a wire is dragging around behind you, or under your feet, or getting tangled and hooked on equipment. With wireless, you have full freedom to move anywhere within the range of the system.

The systems are often used in a "partyline" mode where everyone can talk to everyone. You can also get systems that enable you to set up groups of people who can talk together.

For more information contact the intercom experts at IntercomsOnline.

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